So Why Do Mortgage Rates Change So Much?

Have you ever called a mortgage company and received a quote and then called back the next day and the same rate was no longer available??

Mortgage companies, Banks and Credit Unions are subject to potential daily and even hourly shifts in the market. Interest rates fluctuate on the simple principal of supply and demand.   Global 1

Mortgage rates trade based on Mortgage Back Securities and The Bond Markets as well as the overall economy.  The vehicles that mortgage rates are based on are considered very conservative, stable and tend not to have the wild swings that one would find in the Stock Market.  If the Stock market begins to see large increases or decreases, Investors will shift Billions of dollars in and out of the Stock Market and move them in to the Mortgage Markets.  This will cause mortgage rates to either rise or fall.  Stock Market tanks, good news for Mortgage Rates, Stock Market rallies and rates suffer.   Investors and Traders will constantly shift funds out of the riskier stocks into the safe haven of the mortgage markets.  These shifts can occur as little as once a day or in some cases can happen multiple times during a trading day. Thus causing mortgage rates to possibly change multiple times in a day.

These markets are affected globally as well; so even after the markets are closed in US, whatever is happening in Europe, Asia and around the world will cause our markets to move one way or the other.

What drives interest rates (click here for quick facts)

Here are some of the variables that are being watched in today’s market:

  • Middle East
  • Europe and Asia’s Economy
  • Presidential Race
  • The US Housing Market
  • Unemployment in our Country
  • The Price of Oil and Gas
  • The “Feds” decision to move short term interest rates
  • The overall health of the US EconomyPercent Down

Any of these items can trigger a rally one way or another.  Even a simple comment at a breakfast meeting by the President, the Fed Chairman or someone in power is enough to influence the markets.

Additional Mortgage Rate and Index Information:

To help us understand why mortgage rates change, it is important to realize that there is not one interest rate, but multiple ones. Below are some of the most prevalent interest rates and indexes that also have an impact on mortgage rates:

Prime rate – This rate is often offered to a bank’s best customers. If you are shopping for a home equity line of credit, then it is important to familiarize yourself with the prime rate. HELOCs are typically based upon the prime rate -plus or minus a certain percentage.

LIBOR – Stands for London Inter-bank Offered Rates. Libor rates are based upon the rates that a select group of London Banks offer each other for inter-bank deposits. Many adjustable rate mortgage programs use the Libor index.

Treasury bill rates ”T-bills” and Treasury Notes – These are short-term and intermediate debt instruments used by our Government to finance their debt. The treasury index is based upon the auctions of U.S. Treasury bills or on the Treasury’s yield curve. Like the LIBOR index, the U.S. Treasury index is a popular index for adjustable rate mortgage products. Also, the Twelve Month Treasury Average (12 Month MTA) is a popular index which is based upon the twelve month average of the monthly yields of U.S. Treasury securities (maturing in one year). The MTA is a popular choice for option arm mortgage programs.

Treasury Bonds – Unlike T-bills and Treasury Notes, treasury bonds are long-debt instruments. These bonds are used by the U.S. Government to finance its debt.

Cost of Savings Index – often referred to as the COSI index. This index is based upon the annual average of interest rates on World Savings deposit accounts. The average is pulled on the last day of each month.

11th District Cost of Funds – Often referred to as the COFI index – The COFI index is based upon the average of the borrowing cost to member banks of the Home Loan Bank of San Francisco of the 11th District. Unless you are shopping for an option arm mortgage, it is unlikely that your loan will be affected by this rate.

Certificates of Deposit Index – Often referred to as the CODI index – this index is arrived at by calculating the average of the past twelve months rates of 3 month CD rates.

Federal Funds Rate – The fed funds target rate is the rate which federally chartered banking institutions lend balances to other depository banks overnight.

This is a lot of information to weigh each day when calculating mortgage rates.  In general, most Banks, Investors, Lenders etc. will set rates around 10:30am once most of the morning economic reports have been released and the markets have had time to react to the information.  In a calm trading day on Wall Street, these rates would be good for that imagesCA6UKL3Jday.  In a day where lots of Economic reports and World events are occurring, these rates can be reset a few times as the Markets fluctuate.  It is important to call your lender or bank often to check on these rates as they can and will change.  It also important not to follow online rate sites that may be posting Average Rates as this information can be old as well a different Financial Picture then you may have.  The Freddie Mac rates are based on closed loans from last week and an average of .7 Points of fees in the rate. This may give you a range, but not accurate enough to base your mortgage payment on or what is happening today in the markets.

Bill Nickerson has been in the Mortgage industry since 1991. Please leave a comment, email or call me anytime with questions you may have about mortgage programs, rates and to get approved for a mortgage.

   NMLS# 4194  www.billnickerson.com  978-273-3227

Bill Nickerson

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Let’s Talk Credit: Understanding your Credit Score

Did you know?credit score

  • FICO is an acronym for Fair Isaac and Company.
  • In the 1950’s, Fair Isaac and company created the mathematical calculation that is used to determine your credit score.  It is a tool that was designed to determine one’s credit score and dependability in paying bills.
  • The terms credit score and FICO score are used synonymously.

Twenty or so years ago, lenders and banks would obtain the credit scores from the credit report as a reference point.  Loans were based on the overall financial strength of a borrower and their ability to repay a loan.  The Scores were important but they were not weighed nearly as they are today when making a decision.  If scores were on the low side, compensating factors were looked at such as: additional monthly reserves, the amount of credit accounts you carried, the amount of credit accounts that carry balances, do you have a retirement accounts, etc.  Banks in general want to see that you have at least 6 months of reserves in case you should leave your job and have a few months to carry the loan.  In the case where the loan is riskier or may be a low down payment, the lender will want to see more months of reserves, upwards of 12 months.

Your credit history shows the investor your ability to repay and manage debt.  The older the line of credit, the greater the chance of the scores being higher as credit is based on history.

Click here for quick Credit Tips

In today’s lending market, your credit decision is first based on the score and can have an effect on your final mortgage rate.  In general, most banks will not lend on loans with scores that are under 640 unless there is an exception or compensating factors, but this is very limited.  Many banks today won’t go below 680 and don’t allow for any compensating factors as they feel these mortgages are far too risky to have on their books.  Based on current mortgage guidelines, if your score is under 740, it will affect the price of your mortgage rate and you are penalized.

When making a credit decision, banks and lenders will pull your credit report that offers three different reporting agencies;  Experian, Trans Union and Equifax.  The middle score of the three credit bureaus is used.  Over time, these scores will be very close to each other.  Consumers who are just starting to build credit may find a discrepancy in these scores as not all creditors are required to report to all three bureaus.

Look at how a Credit Score affects your Mortgage Rate

The higher your FICO scores the less you can expect to pay for your loan.

For example, on a $200,000 Loan using a 30 YEAR FIXED RATE MORTGAGE.

Your FICO score is:

Your Interest rate is

And your payment is

740-759

3.875%

$940.47

739-720

3.990%

$953.68

700-719

4.125%

$969.30

680-699

4.250%

$983.88

660-679

4.500%

$1,013.37

640-659

4.625%

$1,028.28

As you can see in this example using a snapshot of the same day’s rate, a person with a FICO score of 760 or better will pay $88 less per month for a $200,000 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage than a person in the lowest score category.

Mortgage Rates are only used as an example and do not reflect the interest rate market of today.

Mortgage programs such as FHA allow for low credit scores so that you can get the most competitive rate but this comes with a price.  FHA will charge mortgage insurance, a monthly fee as well as an up-front fee that will be rolled into the loan amount.  After these insurance fees, a mortgage rate of 4.00% will net a rate of 5.40% with the costs of mortgage insurance that is being charged.  A mistake many borrowers make; chasing the lowest interest without truly understanding the real costs of the mortgage.

Written by Bill Nickerson

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Mortgage Pre-Qualification vs. Pre-Approval

In Today’s Real Estate Market, it is more important than ever to have a Pre-Qualification in hand when shopping for a home that has been prepared by a reputable Lender, Bank or Credit Union.

Pre-Qualification

A mortgage loan pre-qualification is an estimate of how much house you can afford and how much money a lender would be willing to loan you.  The best time to get pre-qualified is right before you start looking at homes.  This way you can focus on looking at houses that are within your price range.  By providing a loan officer with your income, assets, debts, and a potential down payment amount, he would then be able to give you a ballpark figure of how much he thinks you could afford to pay for a monthly mortgage.  Your Credit is reviewed and your loan is submitted through an Automated Underwriting Service (AUS). There is no cost to this service and no commitment is required.  This estimate is a helpful tool to you in figuring out if buying a home is a viable option, and if so, what your price range would probably be. A pre-qualification is to give you a range of home prices and in no way is a commitment to lend on a home. The time frame for this is less than 24 hours.

Pre-Approval

Getting pre-approved means that you have a tentative written commitment from a lender for mortgage funding.  In the pre-approval process, you provide a loan officer with actual documentation of your income, assets, and debts.   The Loan Officer is submitting this as if it is an actual loan and a property has been identified.  This will be reviewed by the lenders underwriting team.  The lender will run a credit check and verify all your employment and financial information. Once the final approval comes in, the lender will give you a letter of commitment stating how much money the bank is willing to loan you for a home purchase. Having a certified pre-approval in hand when you start house hunting lets real estate agents and sellers know you are serious about buying when they see you have your mortgage funding in place.  By having your funding in place, it becomes an extreme advantage over other buyers when it comes to negotiating your home purchase as your offer will stand above the rest and you will be able to close in a much shorter time period. The timeframe for a Pre-Approval can take up to 5 Business Days.closing-costs guy

It is important to note that a pre-approval and a pre-commitment is still subject to further review as any loan is.  As variables change in lending or in the borrowers financial picture, additional items may be required. In addition to the financial commitment, the lender will also need to verify the property appraisal and title search.

Bottom Line:     

Pre-Qualification is an estimate of a price range of what you can afford by verifying credit, income and running your loan through an Automated Underwriting System such as Fannie Mae or FHA as well as others.     Pre-Approval is a verified commitment from the bank stating how much money it will loan you. Make sure your Pre-Approval is an actual commitment from the bank as opposed to a Loan Officer just doing a quick credit check.

For More Information about Loan Approvals, Loan Programs and mortgages that are best suited to your financial needs, contact me anytime at 978-273-3227 or  email me  and  you can always visit my mortgage site at www.billnickerson.com

Bill Nickerson

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What are Closing Costs?

Closing costs are an accumulation of charges paid to different entities associated with the buying and selling of real estate. For buyers in Massachusetts, closing costs will come to about $2600 plus lenders title insurance and any pre-paid items such as real estate taxes, insurance and interest. Empty Piggy Bank

There may be closing costs customary or unique to a certain locality, but closing costs are usually made up of the following:

Third Party Fees (The Hard Costs)

  • Attorney’s fees (yours and your lender’s if applicable)
  • Appraisal
  • Credit Report Fee
  • Loan origination fee (covers lender’s administrative costs)
  • Recording fees
  • Plot Plan or Survey fee
  • Title insurance (yours and your lender’s)
  • Loan discount points (click to the left to see if points are worth it)
  • Any documentation preparation fees

Pre-Paid Items:

  • Property taxes (to cover tax period to date)
  • Interest (paid from date of closing to the following first of the month)
  • First payment to escrow account for future real estate taxes and insurance
    • 3 to 4 months of real estate taxes to be held in escrow
    • 2 months of homeowners insurance to be held in escrow
  • Paid receipt for homeowner’s insurance policy (including fire and flood insurance if applicable)
  • First premium of mortgage insurance (if applicable)

Additional Items that No One Tells You About:

  • Purchase and Sales Review
  • Recorded Homestead Act
  • Representation from a real estate attorney other than what the bank provides
  • Home Inspection
  • One Year of Homeowners Insurance up front
  • Owners Title Insurance
  • Buying the Oil in the Oil Tank of your new home

For more details regarding these items, please see my blog post: Home Buying Closing Costs: What to Expect

Or for more clarification on closing costs and how you can save your buyers money, feel free to contact me anytime at bill@billnickerson.com

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The Home Buying Deal Killers

Buying a home is very exciting. However, nothing can be a bigger disappointment than finding out that your loan is denied before you are about to close your transaction!

Bill Nickerson

You’re a week away from having the keys to your new home and your loan officer calls to let you know that your loan was denied due to a change in your financial profile. This can and does happen, But there are a few things that you can do to make sure that this won’t happen to you.

Keep the following points in mind while you are in the process of buying your home:

  1. Don’t Apply for New Credit of Any Kind.  Don’t respond to any invitations to apply for new lines of credit and don’t establish new lines of credits for furniture, appliances, computers, department stores etc.  Even if there are no payments for 12 months, we will need to count this debt against you.  This will also have an adverse effect on your credit score.  Wait until your loan closes to purchase items for yourself and new home.  It is also important to limit the amount of times you have your credit pulled, as each occurrence will need to be explained.

2.  Don’t Max Out or Over Charge on Existing Credit Cards. Running up your credit cards is the fastest way to bring your score down.  Once you have engaged in the loan process, try to keep your credit card balances to below 30% of the available limit.shopping cart

3. Don’t Close Credit Card Accounts. If you close a credit card account, it can negatively affect your FICO scores as your credit is based on History.  You may have a card that is never used, but dates back 10 years and your scores do weigh heavily on this. If you really want to close an account, wait until after you close the loan.

4. Don’t Raise Red Flags to the Underwriter. Don’t change your name and address, don’t co-sign on another person’s loan. Don’t open up a new checking/savings account, make sure your taxes are filed. The less activity that occurs while your loan is in process; the better it is for you.

5. Don’t Make Large Unexplainable Deposits Into Bank Accounts. Any Deposits into your bank accounts that do not match your past history will be questioned by an underwriter unless the deposit is documented as a gift or can be explained.  This includes cash deposits and moving funds from one account to another. Make sure you write your offer check from the same account you intend on writing your purchase and sales deposit.  All bank accounts must be verified.

6. Don’t Make Changes to Your Employment/Income. Employment stability is a huge factor in the underwriting loan process.  Quitting or changing jobs or even moving positions within the same company can greatly endanger your loan approval.  Inform your loan officer immediately of any changes to your job, position or income and even the hours you work.

7. Your Down Payment:  Do you have your down payment all set? Is it in one account?  Have this prepared before you purchase your home.  Whether it is gift funds, liquidation of your retirement or moving funds from one account to another.  By having these funds all in one account, it will simplify the process.  If you receive a Gift, let’s say for $1,000 from family, Don’t deposit $900 or $1100, as this will be hard to explain why the amount is different from the Gift amount.  Keep it Simple!

8. Do not make any Large Purchases:  If you purchase furniture with no payments for a year, banks will debt you for this.  If you buy a small home in cash, banks will debt you for the taxes and insurance.  College Tuition, even if the loans are deferred, banks will add this to your debts.

Bottom Line: Don’t Make Any Adjustments/Transfers in Your Financial Picture. If you even had to question your decision, make sure you talk to your loan officer first. Don’t make any changes in investments, Move your accounts or transfer, close accounts, open new accounts, or substantially alter your asset picture.

Share this with anyone you know who may be purchasing a home.

Bill Nickerson | PHH Home Loans | NMLS #4194 | Worcester and Leominster Offices | Cell 978-273-3227 | Email Me. | Bill’s Website

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A Proper Moving Checklist 8 Weeks Prior to Closing

So, you bought a new home!!  Congratulations!!!

Moving

Click the Picture to get your Checklist

Now it is time to plan the Move.  Are you Ready?  Excited? Anxious?  Purchasing a new home is the American Dream and you have worked hard to get here.  Moving can be overwhelming, but  If you have a written out plan of attack, it will make things go a lot easier.

To assist you in this,  I have included a Moving Checklist that will map out your every move in the process.  This will help you keep on track from 8 Weeks prior to the move,  right to the day of your Move and to your final destination.

Moving Checklist <– Click here to get a copy

As always, please email or call me at any time for help with financing or questions regarding the economy.  Cell Phone: 978-273-3227 or Bill’s Email

Bill Nickerson

Bill Nickerson

Offices in Worcester and Leominster

PHH Mortgage People

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The True Meaning of National Doughnut Day

National Doughnut Day started in 1938  as a fund raiser for Chicago’s Salvation Army. Their goal was to help the needy during the Great Depression, and to honor The Salvation Army “Lassies” of World War I, who served doughnuts to soldiers.

Donut DolliesSoon after the US entrance into World War I in 1917, The Salvation Army sent a fact-finding mission to France. The mission concluded that the needs of US enlisted men could be met by canteens/social centers termed “huts” that could serve baked goods, provide writing supplies and stamps, and provide a clothes-mending service. Typically, 6 staff members per hut would include four female volunteers who could “mother” the boys. These huts were established by The Salvation Army in the United States near army training centers.

imagesCAF9AO38About 250 Salvation Army volunteers went to France. Because of the difficulties of providing freshly baked goods from huts established in abandoned buildings near to the front lines, the two Salvation Army volunteers (Ensign Margaret Sheldon and Adjutant Helen Purviance) came up with the idea of providing doughnuts. These are reported to have been an “instant hit”, and “soon many soldiers were visiting The Salvation Army huts”.  Often, the doughnuts were cooked in oil inside a metal helmet of an American Soldier.  Salvation Army Lassies were the only women outside of military personnel allowed to visit the front lines.  Lt. Colonel Helen Purviance is considered the Salvation Army’s “first doughnut girl”.

Soon, these workers became known by the servicemen as “Doughnut Dollies”.

images                       When receiving your free doughnut today, remember the true meaning of why you are receiving this today.

Enjoy!!!

Bill Nickerson~~Doughnut Connoisseur as well as Mortgage Professional

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10 Things to do before listing your home

home inspectionWith the onset of the spring home-buying season, home inspections are a must for the seller.  To help make the selling process easier for you, it makes sense to have your home inspected before listing it.  It may sound like a hassle but it could save you a lot of money and stress early on.  The inspection will pinpoint red flags and areas that have potential problems.  It also gives you the opportunity to address those issues before listing your home.  Having your home already inspected ultimately also gives the prospective buyers the comfort and confidence that the seller actually cared about their home in the first place.  Be sure to share this information with prospective buyers by supplying a copy of the home inspection.  It is perfectly okay to choose not to have your home inspected before listing.  If you take this route, just be sure to do your own pre-listing home inspection to keep things significantly less nerve-racking and not terribly costly before the buyer’s home inspector comes through.

Here are 10 areas to look at/fix up before listing your home.

1.  Fix any deteriorated paint jobs.  Touch up any dings on the walls or woodwork, scrape and paint any flaking areas.

2.  For furnaces over 10 years old; pay to have it serviced and cleaned.  Then display the inspection papers (store them in a Ziploc bag) by taping to furnace.

3.  Make sure all toilets are flushed.  Nothing worse than having a seldom used toilet not functioning properly.

4.  Run water down sinks and bathtub drains.  All drains need to flow steadily.  No slow drains!

5.  Check for leaks under sinks and in vanities.  Tighten up joints if necessary.

6.  Check out the condition of the roof.  You want things to look normal: no missing shingles.

7.  Clean out the gutters.  They need to be free of debris for good drainage.

8.  Open and close all windows.  Check for springs working properly so windows don’t slam down. Make sure all the locks work and windows close tightly.

9.  Test any appliances like the dishwasher that you are leaving behind.  You want them working properly. Make sure all burners/oven are working on your stove.

10.  Test the auto reverse on the garage door.  Make sure the safety mechanism works.

For more information about Home Inspectors or how to prepare to list your home, call or email me anytime.  Bill@billnickerson.com

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The Perfect Loan File

This article came from Mark Greene contributor to Forbes Magazine.  It is very helpful to all of us so that we can truly understand what is going on in this industry and so that we can educate our buyers and sellers.

The media has it all wrong – securing mortgage approval and satisfying credit underwriting guidelines are not the difficulties plaguing mortgage consumers. It’s in meeting the rigorous documentation requirements that most people fall flat. The good news is, the fix is simple. Just scan, photocopy, fax, and deliver every aspect of your financial life. Then, shortly before closing, check everything again.closing-costs guy

Mortgage consumers who enter the mortgage approval process ready to battle their chosen mortgage lender will come out with a nightmare story to tell. As the process, requirements, and guidelines are the same for everybody, your mindset is the game-changer. Accepting the redundant documentation necessary for lender approval will make everyone’s life easier.

When I was a kid, my father occasionally issued directives that I naturally thought were superfluous, and when asked why I needed to do whatever it was he wanted me to do, his answer was often: “Because I said so.” This never seemed to address my query but always left me without a retort, and I would usually comply. This is exactly what consumers should do during the mortgage approval process. When your lender requests what seems to be over-documentation and you wonder why you need it, accept the simple edict – “because I said so.” You will find the mortgage approval process much less frustrating.

So, what’s the perfect loan? Well, it’s one that (a) pays back the lender and (b) pays back the lender on time. Underwriting the perfect loan is not the goal that mortgage lenders aspire to today.

The real goal is the perfect loan file.

Mortgage lenders have suffered staggering losses and gone out of business because of the dreaded loan repurchase. As mortgage delinquencies increased, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac began to audit mortgage loans they had purchased and discovered substandard and fraudulent underwriting practices that violated representations and warranties made, stating these were high quality loans. Fannie and Freddie began forcing the originating lenders of these “bad” loans to buy them back. So a small correspondent mortgage lender is forced to buy back a single mortgage loan in the amount of $250,000. This becomes a $250,000 loss to a small mortgage business for a single loan, because it will never be repaid.

It doesn’t take many of these bad loan buybacks to close the doors on many small mortgage operations. The lending houses suffered billions of dollars of losses repurchasing loans from Fannie and Freddie, and began to do the same thing for loans they had purchased from smaller originators.

The small and medium sized mortgage originators that survived created underwriting guidelines and procedures to eliminate the threat of future loan repurchase losses. The answer? The perfect loan file.

shopping cartIt’s no longer necessary to have excellent credit, a big down payment and stable employment with income sufficient to support your debt service to guarantee your loan approval. However, you must have a borrower profile that meets the credit underwriting guidelines for the loan you are requesting. And, more importantly, you have to be able to hard-copy-guideline-document your profile.

Every nook and cranny of your financial life has to be corroborated, double- and triple-checked, and reviewed again before closing. This way, if the originating lender has created a loan file that is exactly consistent with published underwriting guidelines and has documented while adhering to those guidelines, the chances are that your loan will not be subject to repurchase.

Borrowers also need to prepare for processing and underwriting. Processors and underwriters are the people trained and charged with gathering (processors), all of your required-for-approval financial documents, and then approving (underwriters), your loan. You can assume these people are well trained and very experienced, as they are tasked with assembling and approving a high-quality-these-people-will-pay-us-back loan file. But just how do they go about that?

The process begins with the filter – the loan originator (a.k.a loan officer, mortgage consultant, mortgage adviser, etc.) – tasked to match the qualifications of a particular mortgage deal to the appropriate underwriting guidelines. It is the filter’s job to determine if a loan scenario is approvable and to gather the documentation to support that determination. It is here, at the beginning of the approval process, where the deal is made or broken. The rest of the approval process is just papering the file.

The filter determines whether the information provided by the borrower can be validated and documented. This is simple, since most mortgages are approved by automated underwriting engines such as Desktop Underwriter, and the automated approval generates a list of the documents needed to paper the loan file. An underwriter can, at this stage, request additional supporting documentation evidence at their discretion, as not all circumstances neatly fit into the prescribed underwriting box. If the filter creates a loan file with accurate information, then secures the documentation resulting from the automated underwriting findings, the loan will close uneventfully.

So, let’s begin with the pre-approval call. Mortgage pre-approval is typically accomplished with a telephone interview. A prospective borrower calls a mortgage rep (filter), and the questions begin. There will be lots of questions as this critical phase of the process is akin to the discovery period in a trial – you’ll need to disclose everything. Expect to answer queries on what you do for a living, how long you’ve been employed in your current field, and what your salary is. If there is a co-borrower, they will have to answer the same questions.

Every dollar in checking, savings, investments and retirement accounts, also known as assets to close, as well as gifts from relatives and non-profit grants, has to be accounted for. Essentially everything appearing on a borrower’s asset-radar-screen has to be documented and explained.

If you were previously a homeowner and sold your home in a short sale, or if you own a home now and plan to keep it as an investment or rental property, there are new and specific underwriting guidelines created just for you. In these cases, full disclosure of your credit and homeownership past can potentially eliminate unforeseen mortgage approval woes. For instance, Fannie Mae has a new underwriting guideline called “Buy-and-Bail,” for current homeowners’ planning on keeping their existing home as an investment/rental property. Properties not meeting the 30% equity test for “Buy-and-Bail” result in additional asset requirements to purchase a new home. Buyers with a short sale history may have to wait two to three years before they are eligible for mortgage financing again. Full vetting of your previous mortgage life will save you the dreaded we-have-a-problem call from your mortgage lender.

It all comes down to your proof. If the lender asks for a specific document, give them exactly what they are asking for, not what “should be OK,” – because it won’t be.  This is where the approval process tends to go off the rails, when the lender asks for specific documentation and the borrower supplies something else. Here, too, is where both sides get frustrated. So if the lender asks for a bank statement and there are 5 pages for that bank statement, send them all 5 pages, and not just the summary. If you send them the summary page and they ask again, don’t complain that the lender keeps asking for the same thing when you never sent it in the first place. This may sound elementary, but the vast majority of mortgage approval process woes stem from scenarios just like this.

The reason the mortgage approval process is now so rigorous is simple. Avoiding defaults and loan buybacks has become the primary goal of mortgage lenders.   Higher standards are reducing loan defaults, which should mean fewer foreclosures in the future. Government data shows that less than 2% of loans originated in 2009, that were resold to Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae went into default after 18 months, down from more than 22% default rates for 2007 loans.

So when your lender requests specific documents from you, give it to them just “because they said so.”

For more information about lending and financing, please contact Bill at 978-273-3227  or by email  Bill’s Email

Mortgage Document Checklist

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Is Your Glass Half Full or Half Empty?

A psychologist walked around a room while teaching stress management to an audience. Half FullAs she raised a glass of water, everyone expected they’d be asked the “half empty or half full” question. Instead, with a smile on her face, she inquired: “How heavy is this glass of water?”

Answers called out ranged from 8 oz. to 20 oz.

She replied, “The absolute weight doesn’t matter. It depends on how long I hold it. If I hold it for a minute, it’s not a problem. If I hold it for an hour, I’ll have an ache in my arm. If I hold it for a day, my arm will feel numb and paralyzed. In each case, the weight of the glass doesn’t change, but the longer I hold it, the heavier it becomes.”

She continued, “The stresses and worries in life are like that glass of water. Think about them for a while and nothing happens. Think about them a bit longer and they begin to hurt. And if you think about them all day long, you will feel paralyzed – incapable of doing anything.”

Remember to put the glass down…

I found this on the internet of course, and could not find a source to give credit.  It was a very clear message and wanted to share it.  Enjoy!  ~Bill

 

Bill Nickerson has been in the Mortgage Industry since 1991.  Feel free to contact him at 978-273-3227 or email at bill@billnickerson.com

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